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Rainy Day History Podcast

What is Seattle’s story? Who does it belong to? How did we get to where we are now?

Welcome to Rainy Day History, a podcast by the MOHAI Youth Advisors. Seattle is famous for its coffee beans and digital machines, but it hasn’t always been that way. We’re diving into history to uncover what it means to be a Seattleite both in the past and the present. This isn’t your everyday museum podcast—it’s completely teen-researched, written, and produced! #MOHAIteens

Rainy Day History

Rainy Day History is a podcast by the MOHAI Youth Advisors (MYA). Dive into the muddy and complicated waters of Seattle’s past, its struggles with inclusion and exclusion, and histories of community, resilience, and belonging.

This podcast is entirely researched, written, and produced by the MOHAI Youth Advisors, a dedicated and creative group of high school students who guide the museum in what teens want and need. You can find out more about MYA at mohai.org/mya.

MYA wants Seattle history to belong to all of us who are often marginalized in textbooks. These episodes are filled with our own arguments, thoughts, worries, and musings.

New episodes this summer! Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher.

Episodes and Show Notes

Rainy Day History Season Two

Season two is all about “growth” – tackling inclusion and exclusion through projects, people, and events that helped expand Seattle and put it on the map!

Learn about marvelous buildings, transit plans that went nowhere, and cultural movements that drew people to the city. We’ll also be exploring how growth for some often comes at the expense of others. There are several new voices this season – not only is there a new MYA team but each episode features a special guest interview.

Launching summer 2020!

Season Two Trailer

Rainy Day History is back for another season! The 2020 MYA team has been hard at work putting together brand new episodes for you to enjoy this summer.

Episode date: July 9, 2020
Length: 4:33

Exploring the theme of “growth”, these eight episodes will be tackling inclusion and exclusion through projects, people, and events that helped expand Seattle and put it on the map. Featuring new voices, new segments, and special guests! In this trailer, hear from host TK about what to expect in season two, interview clips from our first three episodes, and a get a sneak peek at the first episode with a trivia question from India! New episodes to be released every Thursday beginning July 23.

Special Guest Voices (in order of appearance)

Episode Credits

  • This trailer was written and performed by TK and India, and produced by Ziah.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA.
  • Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive.

Stream Rainy Day History Season Two Trailer on SoundCloud

Download a Rainy Day History Season Two Trailer transcript (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 7–Seattle’s Resilient Chinese Pioneers

Episode date: July 23, 2020

Length: 34:49

Seattle’s Chinatown/International District has been through a lot over the decades. Learn how Seattle’s earliest Chinese American pioneers built and maintained community in the face of racism, riots, and constant change. In this episode, we explore the resiliency of this neighborhood during its original settlement, re-settlement, and growth in the mid-late 1800s.

Our special guest is Doan Nguyen, Senior Tour Manager at the Wing Luke Museum, who shares about the history of the museum’s building and the stories it has to tell about life in the CID during the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act.

Related MOHAI Content

  • View items in the MOHAI online collection related to the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Wa Chong Co.
  • Listen to past History Café recordings on SoundCloud related to the Chinese Exclusion Act
    • Building Tradition: Pan-Asian Seattle and the Residential Hotels
    • Seattle 1860-1910 Through the Eyes of its First Chinese Resident
    • Untold Stories from the Chinese Exclusion Act Files
    • Resilience Past and Present in the Chinatown International District
  • Most relevant gallery in True Northwest: The Seattle Journey – High Hopes

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional sources include:

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Doan Nguyen!
  • The script was researched by India and Jason, written by Jason, and edited by TK & India.
  • This episode was produced by Annabelle & Julia and edited by Sue and Vance.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from TK.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA.
  • Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 7–Seattle’s Resilient Chinese Pioneers on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 7–Seattle’s Resilient Chinese Pioneers (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 8–The Forgotten World’s Fair

Episode date: July 30, 2020

Length: 32:41

Besides the famous Century 21 World’s Fair that gave Seattle the Space Needle and many of the buildings at Seattle Center, Seattle played host to another World’s Fair, the 1909 Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition! The AYPE put Seattle on the map by marketing it as a resource-rich global city, showcased the latest technology, and laid the groundwork for the University of Washington’s beautiful Seattle campus.

Hear from special guest Anne Jenner, Pacific Northwest Curator at the UW Libraries Special Collections Division about some of the amazing historic items from the AYPE in their collection and some of the more unbelievable aspects of the fair.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional sources include:

  • History Link entry 7082
  • Beger, Knute. “The birth of modern SeattleCrosscut, 26 November 2009.
  • Klingle, Matthew. Emerald City: an environmental history of Seattle, Yale University Press, 2009.
  • The quote about the treatment of Filipinos at the AYP is from a press release from the Pacific Northwest Chapter of BAYAN in 2009
  • The quote from Dr. Coll Thrush came from his book Native Seattle, p119. University of Washington Press, 2009.

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Anne Jenner!
  • The script was researched by India & Annabelle, written by Annabelle & Atul, and edited by India & Annabelle.
  • This episode was produced by Annabelle & Vance and edited by Karl & Vance.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from Ziah.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA.
  • Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 8–The Forgotten World’s Fair on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 8–The Forgotten World’s Fair (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 9–A Lamentable Spectacle

Episode date: August 6, 2020

Length: 31:04

Seattle transit plans have always had a hard time at the polls, going all the way back to 1911, when voters overwhelmingly rejected Virgil Bogue’s vision for a Seattle with public transit at its core. The Bogue Plan was the city’s first comprehensive plan and included big and bold ideas: 90 miles of rail transit, a brand-new civic center and grand central station, converting all of Mercer Island into a public park, and more! How did the plan’s spectacular failure at the polls shape the way we navigate and inhabit our city today?

Hear from special guest Eric Scigliano, writer and journalist, about what he’s learned from researching the Bogue Plan and other “Seattles that might have been”.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional sources include:

The quote from the Daily Mail was found in Sarah Anne Lloyd’s article “Seattle’s Long History of Transit Funding” on Curbed Seattle, 29 October 2019.

Additional quotes and population statistics were found in Ross Anderson’s article listed above.

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Eric Scigliano!
  • The script was researched by India & Ethan, written by Atul & Jason, edited by India, Karl, and Ethan.
  • This episode was produced by Sue & Julia and edited by Karl, Sue, & Vance.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from Ziah & Ethan
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA.
  • Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 9–A Lamentable Spectacle on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 9–A Lamentable Spectacle (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 10–Serenity, Surprise, and Delight

Episode date: August 13, 2020

Length: 35:49

Explore the life, times, and creations of architect Minoru Yamasaki, designer of many iconic buildings including the Pacific Science Center arches, downtown Seattle’s Rainier Tower, and the original World Trade Center. Although Yamasaki’s buildings are spread across the globe, his life and career are deeply connected to Seattle’s history.

Hear from special guest Dr. Paul Kidder, professor of philosophy at Seattle University who is currently writing a book about Yamasaki, about what he finds fascinating about Yamasaki’s designs.

Related MOHAI Content

  • View items in MOHAI’s online collection about Minoru Yamasaki
  • Most relevant gallery in True Northwest: the Seattle Journey – Changes

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional research came from:

Quotes about Yamasaki’s artistic philosophy and Yamasaki’s translated term, from a Time Magazine interview, were found in Dale Allen Gyure’s article in the Architectural Review listed above.

Quotes written by Minoru Yamasaki himself came from his autobiography, A Life in Architecture. Weatherhill, 1 September 1979.

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Dr. Paul Kidder!
  • The script was researched by Karl & Atul, written by Karl, and edited by TK & Vance.
  • This episode was produced by Vance & Karl and edited by Karl & Vance.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from TK.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA.
  • Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 10–Serenity, Surprise, and Delight on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 10–Serenity, Surprise, and Delight (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 11–Location, Location, Location

Episode date: August 20, 2020

Length: 32:57

The now gone but fondly remembered Kingdome stadium came into being in the 1970s as a result of a package of ballot initiatives called Forward Thrust. Although the proposal to build a new stadium did well at the polls, finding a place to put it proved more than difficult. When its location near King Street was decided, community activists in the Chinatown International District pushed back, sparking a larger neighborhood preservation movement whose work and legacy still continues today.

Hear from special guest Gary Iwamoto about this era of activism and the founding of InterIm CDA, an affordable housing and community development organization.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional research came from:

The quote from Jim Ellis was found in Shaun Scott’s Part 2 essay linked above, and is from a November 1965 speech where he commenced the Forward Thrust effort.

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Gary Iwamoto, and the staff & volunteers at InterIm CDA!
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA.
  • Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 11–Location, Location, Location on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 11–Location, Location, Location (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 12–I Need the Volume Higher

Episode date: August 27, 2020

Length: 34:41

We hope you’re ready to rock, because this episode we’re diving headfirst into the 1990s Seattle music scene. From grunge, to riot grrrl, to hip hop, learn about how these young artists put Seattle music (and its style) on the map at the same time the Teen Dance Ordinance made all-ages shows nearly impossible to produce.

Our special guest this episode is Tova Gaster, director of outreach for the TeenTix New Guard, Teen Editor with the TeenTix Press Corps, and avid all ages show-goer.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional research came from:

The quote from Kio Novina came from Jennifer Vogel’s Mother Jones article listed above.

This episode’s title comes from “Posse on Broadway” by Sir Mix-a-Lot.

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Tova Gaster, and the TeenTix New Guard!
  • The script was researched by Jason, written by Jason, and edited by TK & Vance. This episode was produced by Vance and edited by Karl & Vance.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from Ziah.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA. Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 12–I Need the Volume Higher on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 12–I Need the Volume Higher (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 13–A Place of Escape

Episode date: September 3, 2020

Length: 36:51

Since the 1970s, Capitol Hill has been a home for the LGBTQ+ community in Seattle. Over the decades, LGBTQ+ businesses and services have both contributed to gentrification and been at risk from it. Learn about what it took to grow and build a supportive district for Seattle’s LGBTQ+ residents, as we explore the relationship between place and community.

Hear from special guest Ken Shulman, Executive Director of Lambert House, about where queer youth fit into this history and the importance of the neighborhood to the organization.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional research came from:

The quote from Randy Henson that gave us our episode title came from a piece he wrote for the Seattle Eagle, “Randy Henson’s brief history of the Seattle Eagle: Daring to be different for 35 years”, 27 June 2015.

The quote about the Dorian Society came from History Link.

The quote from Kevin McKenna and Michael Aguirre came from their essay for the UW Civil Rights & Labor History Project “A brief history of LGBTQ Activism in Seattle.”

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Ken Schulman, and the staff & volunteers at Lambert House!
  • The script was researched by TK & Ethan, written by TK & Ethan, edited by TK & Karl. This episode was produced by Julia and edited by Sue & Vance.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from TK & Ziah.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA. Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 13–A Place of Escape on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 13–A Place of Escape (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 14–Booms, Busts, and Billionaires

Episode date: September 9, 2020

Length: 35:38

It’s the final episode of the season! There’s no denying it: Seattle is a tech city. After Microsoft moved to the Pacific Northwest, the Seattle area became a hub for computer and internet tech start-ups in the 1990s. Some saw incredible success, while others just weren’t able to survive. We’ll be looking at the 90s-era and contemporary tech booms, and the effects that large companies like Amazon and Microsoft have had on Seattle.

Plus, hear from special guest Naud Frijlink, Principal Design Manager at Microsoft, about what it’s been like working in the sector across multiple decades and cities.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional research came from:

Episode Credits

  • Special thanks to our interview guest, Naud Frijlink!
  • The script was researched by India, Karl, & Atul, written by Karl, Atul, Ethan, & Jason, and edited by Annabelle. This episode was produced by Julia and edited by Sue & Karl.
  • Show notes and transcripts were built by Julia, Ziah, India, & Ethan. Marketing help came from Ziah.
  • This season was imagined by the 2020 MOHAI Youth Advisors. The podcast was developed by the 2019 MYA. Grace designed the logo, and Finch wrote the theme music and performed it along with Tyler and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang.
  • Thank you to all of our MOHAI staff cheerleaders, and special thanks for this season goes to Chris, Leonard, Sondra, Tori, and Emily T.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/
  • Trivia music is “Sounds like Jobim on a Mario in an Elevator” by μB on Free Music Archive

Resources for Further Exploration

Stream Episode 14–Booms, Busts, and Billionaires on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 14–Booms, Busts, and Billionaires (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Rainy Day History Season One

Each episode of season one highlights one object on display in MOHAI at a time, to explore what stories it has to tell about what it means to be a Seattleite. Discover the history of objects that are personal and political – childhood treasures abandoned in times of war, a memorable discotheque marquee, protest art, and more – and examine the legacies that the events surrounding them have left for this city.

Season One Trailer

Welcome to Rainy Day History, a podcast by the MOHAI Youth Advisors!

Episode date: September 25, 2019
Length: 2:49

Seattle is famous for its coffee beans and digital machines, but it hasn’t always been that way. We’re diving into history to uncover what it means to be a Seattleite both in the past and the present. This isn’t your everyday museum podcast—it’s completely teen-researched, written, and produced!

Stream Rainy Day History Trailer on SoundCloud

Download a Rainy Day History Trailer transcript (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 1–Kikisoblu/Princess Angeline

Episode date: October 4, 2019

Length: 12:37

The city of Seattle, as it is now known, has been the home of the Duwamish people since time immemorial. The relationship between the city and the Duwamish is long and complicated—too long for a single episode.

In this episode we explore a single artifact: the cane of Kikisoblu, the daughter of Chief Si’ahl, who refused to leave when the Duwamish were expelled from the city. It is a story of survival and competing legacies.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

The quote from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz came from Native American Women Are More than Princesses and Squaws Bitch Media. September 19, 2017.

Additional sources include:

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Leela, written by Emily C. and recorded by Ziah and Julia.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 1–Kikisoblu/Princess Angeline on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 1–Kikisoblu/Princess Angeline (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 2–Life’s Weary Way

Episode date: October 18, 2019

Length: 15:27

Seattle the pioneer town was home to logging, coal, fishing…and lots of men. In 1864 Asa Mercer had a plan to “civilize” this rough and tumble Seattle—bring over boatloads of women!

In this episode we learn about one of these women, Lizzie Ordway, her journey, and her influence on the city. We also explore Seattle’s complicated image as a pioneer town and rapidly shifting definitions of what it means to be an early settler.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

The statistics about early Seattle demographics came from Quintard Taylor’s The Forging of a Black Community: Seattle’s Central District, from 1870 Through the Civil Rights Era (University of Washington Press, 1994).

The quote from historian Lorraine McCounaghy came from Sherry Stripling’s article “Genealogist tracks the Mercer Girls” in the Chicago Tribune, 7 April 2004.

The quote about the Mercer Girls being thanked for their self-sacrificing spirit that gave us our episode title came from an article in the May 28, 1864 edition of the Seattle Weekly Gazette. While it appeared in a number of our research sources, it was properly cited in Paul B. Hagen’s Harvard University 2017 graduate thesis paper “How the Civil War Civilized Seattle”.

Additional sources include:

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Julia, written by Andrea and Leela, and recorded by Emily T.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 2–Life’s Weary Way on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 2–Life’s Weary Way

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 3–Heirs of the American Experiment

Episode date: November 1, 2019

Length: 16:28

Jumping forward a little bit in history (there’s only so much time!), this episode explores the local impacts of Japanese incarceration during World War.

Some objects, like a set of Hinamatsuri dolls, were left behind. Others, like the wooden chest belonging to Kino Iwasaki, were used to re-build life post-incarceration. This is a story of struggle, resistance, and what is often left out of the Seattle narrative.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

The quote from the Japanese American National Museum came from “What is Hinamatsuri?” on the Discover Nikkei website.

The quote from Justice Frank Murphy that gave us our episode title came from his written dissent for Korematsu v. U.S. You can read this quote and two other dissenting quotes on the US Courts website.

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Tyler, written by Leela, and recorded by Ziah and Andrea.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 3–Heirs of the American Experiment on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 3–Heirs of the American Experiment

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 4–A Voice Like Honey at Dusk

Episode date: November 15, 2019

Length: 11:51

Gentrification is a hot topic in Seattle right now, as areas like the Central District are rapidly changing. Since this is a history podcast, let’s take a look at what stories are at risk of being pushed out as well, and examine what and who has historically called this neighborhood home.

Through the story of jazz icon and Seattle legend Ernestine Anderson, we dive into the fight for equality, space, and African-American art in Seattle’s history.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

  • Seattle on the Spot interpretive materials, to which Al Smith Jr., Paul de Barros, Quin’Nita Cobbins, and Howard Giske contributed their expertise.
  • History Link entry 8520
  • Anna Callahan, “Remembering Jazz Legend Ernestine Anderson” from 4Culture (2016)
  • Jamala Henderson, “Why is Seattle so racially segregated?KUOW, 20 Sep 2016
  • Quintard Taylor, The Forging of a Black Community: Seattle’s Central District, from 1870 Through the Civil Rights Era (University of Washington Press, 1994)
  • Peter Vacher, “Ernestine Anderson obituaryThe Guardian, 20 Mar 2016

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Julia, written by Emily C., and recorded by Emily T.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 4–A Voice Like Honey At Dusk on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 4–A Voice Like Honey At Dusk

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 5–Dancing Out of the Shadows

Episode date: November 29, 2019

Length: 14:44

For some, Seattle has long been considered a haven for the LGBTQ community. This episode examines the complexities of making space for marginalized communities in Seattle through the lens of the LGBTQ community’s shared gathering spaces and their movement throughout Seattle’s history.

We discuss Shelly’s Leg, a gay bar in Seattle, how it was a trailblazer in the fight to create accepting and inclusive spaces, and why in the world it’s called “Shelly’s Leg” (hint: there’s an actual leg involved).

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional sources include:

Special thanks to MOHAI staff member Rachel for her contribution

Episode Credits

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 5–Dancing Out of the Shadows

Download a transcript of Episode 5–Dancing Out of the Shadows

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 6–Teamsters and Turtles

Episode date: December 13, 2019

Length: 15:42

Trade, turtles, and giant protests, oh my!

In this final episode, host Atul and guest-host Leela take you on a wild ride throughout Seattle’s history of labor movements, culminating in the tensions and tribulations of the 1999 World Trade Organization Protests. The episode features fabulous protest art in the form of cardboard turtle costumes.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

Additional research came from:

The quote from Tico Almeda came from an interview with the WTO History Project

The quote from John F. Goodman came from “Voices From the WTO,” produced by Evergreen State college, accessed through the UW WTO History project

Special thanks to MOHAI staff Clara, Lynne, and Rachel for their contributions

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by Atul and Leela, researched by Julia and Leela, written by Leela, and recorded by Leela, Atul, and Emily T.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 6–Teamsters and Turtles

Download a transcript of Episode 6–Teamsters and Turtles

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

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