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Rainy Day History Podcast

What is Seattle’s story? Who does it belong to? How did we get to where we are now?

Welcome to Rainy Day History, a podcast by the MOHAI Youth Advisors. Seattle is famous for its coffee beans and digital machines, but it hasn’t always been that way. We’re diving into history to uncover what it means to be a Seattleite both in the past and the present. This isn’t your everyday museum podcast—it’s completely teen-researched, written, and produced! #MOHAIteens

Rainy Day History

Rainy Day History is a podcast by the MOHAI Youth Advisors (MYA). Dive into the muddy and complicated waters of Seattle’s past, its struggles with inclusion and exclusion, and histories of community, survival, and belonging. Each episode of Rainy Day History highlights one object on display in MOHAI at a time, to explore what stories it has to tell about what it means to be a Seattleite.

Discover the history of objects that are personal and political – childhood treasures abandoned in times of war, a memorable discotheque marquee, protest art, and more – and examine the legacies that the events surrounding them have left for this city.

This podcast is entirely researched, written, and produced by the MOHAI Youth Advisors, a dedicated and creative group of high school students who guide the museum in what teens want and need. You can find out more about MYA at mohai.org/mya.

MYA wants Seattle history to belong to all of us who are often marginalized in textbooks. These episodes are filled with our own arguments, thoughts, worries, and musings.

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher!

Episodes and Show Notes

Rainy Day History Trailer

Welcome to Rainy Day History, a podcast by the MOHAI Youth Advisors!

Episode date: September 25, 2019
Length: 2:49

Seattle is famous for its coffee beans and digital machines, but it hasn’t always been that way. We’re diving into history to uncover what it means to be a Seattleite both in the past and the present. This isn’t your everyday museum podcast—it’s completely teen-researched, written, and produced!

Stream Rainy Day History Trailer on Soundcloud

Download a Rainy Day History Trailer transcript (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 1–Kikisoblu/Princess Angeline

Episode date: October 4, 2019

Length: 12:37

The city of Seattle, as it is now known, has been the home of the Duwamish people since time immemorial. The relationship between the city and the Duwamish is long and complicated—too long for a single episode.

In this episode we explore a single artifact: the cane of Kikisoblu, the daughter of Chief Si’ahl, who refused to leave when the Duwamish were expelled from the city. It is a story of survival and competing legacies.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

The quote from Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz came from Native American Women Are More than Princesses and Squaws Bitch Media. September 19, 2017.

Additional sources include:

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Leela, written by Emily C. and recorded by Ziah and Julia.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 1–Kikisoblu/Princess Angeline on Soundcloud

Download a transcript of Episode 1–Kikisoblu/Princess Angeline (PDF)

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 2–Life’s Weary Way

Episode date: October 18, 2019

Length: 15:27

Seattle the pioneer town was home to logging, coal, fishing…and lots of men. In 1864 Asa Mercer had a plan to “civilize” this rough and tumble Seattle—bring over boatloads of women!

In this episode we learn about one of these women, Lizzie Ordway, her journey, and her influence on the city. We also explore Seattle’s complicated image as a pioneer town and rapidly shifting definitions of what it means to be an early settler.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

The statistics about early Seattle demographics came from Quintard Taylor’s The Forging of a Black Community: Seattle’s Central District, from 1870 Through the Civil Rights Era (University of Washington Press, 1994).

The quote from historian Lorraine McCounaghy came from Sherry Stripling’s article “Genealogist tracks the Mercer Girls” in the Chicago Tribune, 7 April 2004.

The quote about the Mercer Girls being thanked for their self-sacrificing spirit that gave us our episode title came from an article in the May 28, 1864 edition of the Seattle Weekly Gazette. While it appeared in a number of our research sources, it was properly cited in Paul B. Hagen’s Harvard University 2017 graduate thesis paper “How the Civil War Civilized Seattle”.

Additional sources include:

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Julia, written by Andrea and Leela, and recorded by Emily T.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.
  • Rain sound effects came from https://freesound.org/people/barkenov/sounds/255900/

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 2–Life’s Weary Way on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 2–Life’s Weary Way

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 3–Heirs of the American Experiment

Episode date: November 1, 2019

Length: 16:28

Jumping forward a little bit in history (there’s only so much time!), this episode explores the local impacts of Japanese incarceration during World War.

Some objects, like a set of Hinamatsuri dolls, were left behind. Others, like the wooden chest belonging to Kino Iwasaki, were used to re-build life post-incarceration. This is a story of struggle, resistance, and what is often left out of the Seattle narrative.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

The quote from the Japanese American National Museum came from “What is Hinamatsuri?” on the Discover Nikkei website.

The quote from Justice Frank Murphy that gave us our episode title came from his written dissent for Korematsu v. U.S. You can read this quote and two other dissenting quotes on the US Courts website.

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Tyler, written by Leela, and recorded by Ziah and Andrea.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 3–Heirs of the American Experiment on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 3–Heirs of the American Experiment

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

Episode 4–A Voice Like Honey at Dusk

Episode date: November 15, 2019

Length: 11:51

Gentrification is a hot topic in Seattle right now, as areas like the Central District are rapidly changing. Since this is a history podcast, let’s take a look at what stories are at risk of being pushed out as well, and examine what and who has historically called this neighborhood home.

Through the story of jazz icon and Seattle legend Ernestine Anderson, we dive into the fight for equality, space, and African-American art in Seattle’s history.

Related MOHAI Content

Episode Sources

We relied heavily on the following sources to build our narrative:

  • Seattle on the Spot interpretive materials, to which Al Smith Jr., Paul de Barros, Quin’Nita Cobbins, and Howard Giske contributed their expertise.
  • History Link entry 8520
  • Anna Callahan, “Remembering Jazz Legend Ernestine Anderson” from 4Culture (2016)
  • Jamala Henderson, “Why is Seattle so racially segregated?KUOW, 20 Sep 2016
  • Quintard Taylor, The Forging of a Black Community: Seattle’s Central District, from 1870 Through the Civil Rights Era (University of Washington Press, 1994)
  • Peter Vacher, “Ernestine Anderson obituaryThe Guardian, 20 Mar 2016

Episode Credits

  • This episode was hosted by TK and Atul, researched by Julia, written by Emily C., and recorded by Emily T.
  • Our logo was designed by Grace. Our music was written by Finch and performed by Finch, Tyler, and friend of the pod Sylvie Wang. Our editors are Finch and Grace.

Resources for Further Exploration 

Stream Episode 4–A Voice Like Honey At Dusk on SoundCloud

Download a transcript of Episode 4–A Voice Like Honey At Dusk

Subscribe and listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher

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